Friday, July 14, 2017

StyleArc Evie top

At StyleArc’s site this is simply described as Knit tank top with a shaped hemline. I would add that is has some flare. I made my second version this week. I added a little bit to the flare.

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This is the first one I made, shown as work in progress a few weeks ago. It’s still the only picture I have of it, but it’s been worn and washed several times already (it is hemmed and topstitched after this photo was taken).

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Being such an easy to wear style on warmer summer days I made another one, in a fabric with a print this time.

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In the past I’ve had some problems getting at ease with my coverstitch machine, but we’re working well together now. I’m very happy with the finishing details.

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Inside of the neckline. There was a tan coloured thread on my serger, the black is from the coverstitch.

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The hem, done as I described in this post. Basting it first makes it take 10 minutes extra, but so worth it. The cutting line is enclosed by the stitches.

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Sunday, June 25, 2017

Linen dress

If you’ve seen this post before without text: I clicked the wrong button and uploaded the post accidentally that only contained pictures.

This fabric spoke to me (loudly!) when I was at a fabric market this spring. I passed the stall once, but when I passed it a second time I could  not resist and bought it. It’s a 100% linen fabric, which I love to wear in summer. I lined it with a viscose (rayon) good quality lining and it’s ever so comfortable.

The pattern is self drafted based on the sloper from the Suzy Furrer class and boat neck instructions from her class as well. As instructed I used the lower point for rotating the darts (for those interested/having experience with her method). Next time I would reposition the bust dart again and have it at the higher point. In this rather busy print it’s not that obvious, but I think it’s a bit low.

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This photo reminds me of the fact that I still have to sew the lining to the slit in the back (and no, I’m not that addicted to my phone , it’s my remote for my camera)

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The shoulder dart is kept for shape and has to remain in the facing too. As I do usually I made the facing a top layer of the lining and did not make a separate lining pattern. I just sew the seams of the lining giving a bit more space, this way there won’t be any stress on the garment. It sounds strange, but the lining is slightly larger in circumference than the actual dress.

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Thursday, June 15, 2017

Marking seam allowances

Though I admit that default seam allowances to pattern pieces can be very useful when the seams are long and more or less straight, most of the time I prefer to mark the exact seam lines on my fabric. Especially when the seams have short curves, like a neckline, armhole or princess seam. The same is true for darts: I like to know exactly where the lines on the pattern were (or where I drafted them) and don’t want to rely on pins or tacks with basting thread.

My preferred way of marking is with carbon paper. I know I’ve written about it before but it’s a long time ago. Apart from the carbon paper, which is also called wax paper, you need a tracing wheel and a table or flat surface you can put the paper on. I use a cutting mat for it.

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The way it’s done is marking the pieces first while the pattern is still attached to the fabric, then you take the paper off, flip the fabric over to the other side and retrace again over the lines you made. I use this for almost all patterns that don’t include seam allowances. On those that have seam allowances I mark the notches and other significant marks on the pattern this way. The above pattern piece is a facing of a dress that I drafted and I haven’t added seam allowances to the pattern.

The paper is years old, taped on the back side and still very useful. It will last a very long time. There are of course exceptions to the use of it: sheer fabric and white are difficult fabrics for this. For white I will use white wax paper. Much less clear to see but I don’t want the risk of the marking showing. If in doubt you should always test it first.

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For the darts I mark the end points with a small line too.

I learned to sew with exact seam lines (though by basting them, which is a very time consuming job) and like I said before, it’s what I prefer. The pictures above are from a dress I’m making right now. Hope to show you that soon.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Meeting Jane

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of meeting Jane from the blog Lucky Sew and Sew. I’ve been following her blog for years and when I learned she was coming to Amsterdam I couldn’t pass on the opportunity and asked whether it was possible to meet. Lucky me, she liked the idea to meet too and her husband didn’t mind to be on his own for a couple of hours (lovely man) so the arrangement was easily made. Jane was curious to see the famous Kantje Boord lingerie fabric shop so that’s where we met. Needless to say we spent quite a bit of time there and of course fabrics and notions came home with us too. Jane was wearing one of her lovely tops that she showed in her last post before her trip, looking great and ever so comfortable for travelling. Thank you Jane for taking the time to meet, I enjoyed every minute of it.

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My haul did include these beautiful combinations. I hadn’t been to the shop for quite a while and it was inspiring to go there again. These fabrics are shouting at me to be made soon (they’re not used in my next project though).n

A lace border with lace fabric to match.

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Border lace with matching shoulder straps and bows.

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Saturday, June 3, 2017

Lace bra

It’s been a while since I made a bra and it is more than time to make a few new sets. This is my first bra of what I hope will be at least 3 new sets in the next few weeks. It still lacks a bow as I’ve forgotten to take one with me (being abroad for the moment on a lovely holiday). But I’m ever so happy that the fit is very good, as I’ve been struggling with that recently.
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It’s made of lace which I underlined with a tule to give it the strength I need. Only the plain part of the band you see is stretching. It’s a kind of powernet.
The pattern is a copy from a rtw bra with adaptions, as I was not happy with the fit of that one any more either.
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The inside. I hope you can see that there are two layers of fabric in the cups too. The tule that I used for the bridge and side of the cup is more sturdy and more white than the other fabrics. It doesn’t worry me as it does not show from the right side.
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I tried something new with construction and used Vliesofix (similar or the same as bondaweb?) to bond the lace and tule together. I’ve very often used two layers of fabric, using different ways to keep them together but this worked so easy. The two layers could very easily be treated as one during sewing. It’s not visible at all. 
I’m expecting the glue in between will dissolve after a while, which is fine I think, as this is not where the strength comes from.
Parting shot of a view we had during one of our walks. It’s not sewing that is the main activity of this holiday (which is almost over, a few more days).
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Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Christia pants

Last week I showed you how I did the cuff on the pair of pants I was making and today I can show the finished result. It’s made in a linen with some stretch. It may not be the best style on me but I don’t think it’s that bad either. I like it for summer.

 

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It even has pockets that work well. Often this style of pockets stands away from my body because of the curve in my figure but these are more narrow, a straighter angle if you know what I mean.

This is how I did the pocket edge. This is a pattern piece that is not mentioned in the overview of included pattern  pieces but it’s there and if I understand StyleArc correctly it has to be cut from fusible interfacing and applied to the pocket edge (the instructions talk about pocket edge, pocket bearer and pocket bag. Not intuitive to me and I’m glad I know how to construct a pocket without instructions). As I prefer the pocket lining of a thin fabric (lining or cotton) I cut the pocket edge of the garment fabric and from a piece of silk organza. The edge of the pocket was on the straight of grain of the organza. This way I make sure there is no stretch in the pocket opening. I placed it on top of the pocket lining and treated it as one layer during construction. This way there is no lining fabric visible if the pocket is open a bit.

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I did not make the side zipper all the way up to the waistband. I could not find a long enough zipper in the right colour and decided to make buttons in the waistband. Improvising a little here as the waistband had already been cut and I could not re-cut. A little hole is visible above the zipper but it’s not bothering me too much.Will probably wear it with a top over the waistband anyhow.

To conclude: a nice pattern that I only had to tweak a little. I had to heighten 2 cm and take in a bit at center back plus I made a contour/shaped waistband to get a good fitting waistband.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

The magazine goes to …

Anne

I’m a day later than I said I would post this. Just didn’t have time yesterday. There were 14 ladies interested and the majority for the Knip mode magazine.

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Anne, if you send me an email with the address to send the Knip mode to, I’ll post it to you this week. Hope you enjoy it.

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As much as I hoped to finish the pants yesterday, that didn’t work out either. We got a lot of work done in the allotment garden. Such fun to eat lettuce we’ve sown and grown ourselves (in the greenhouse).

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And it looks like we’re going to have tomatoes. They survived the cold spell we had (the greenhouse is not heated).

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My next post will be sewing related, I promise.